TRUMP – Against the false song of globalism

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Foto: Lucas Jackson


 We don’t agree with Trump on a lot of issues. We also don’t believe he is as bad as people portray him to be. That being said, we think he is the candidate that America needs right now. The only thing the unsatisfied can do now is what the Think Tanks did during the Reagan years: work with him. Sell him your ideas. If you honestly think he is a self-centered egomanic, help him be the best president he can be. One more thing: we also don’t believe Pence would enter the race with Donald if he was as bad as people say he is. We are endorsing him. 


THE CASE FOR TRUMP

AGAINST THE FALSE SONG OF GLOBALISM

The perspective of a Brazilian.

To understand the flow of decisions and policy-making one should be able to understand that money is not the only – not even the main – issue. It is not hard to imagine someone being subservient to his slave master because of fear or stagnation before an immense strength. But maybe it is just too hard to imagine someone being subservient or loyal  to someone for a long time because of his or her pockets. If that was true – that material compensations were more important than strength –  there would the no politicians. After all, the presidency is the worst place to get rich. Rather, a position inside a lobby firm (just like Tim Pawlenty has got now) is way better to achieve financial gains. Other than that, an ex-president tends to intervene very little on internal issues .There isn’t much to do besides giving speeches.

So, if it is easy to understand that money is not the main goal of a politician’s quest, then we should be able to say that power – or the appearance of power – should be considered more valuable to someone seeking votes. Yes, power is more important. Not power as a result of the combination of money and strength, but pure strength. You got to have money to wage war, of course, being it a political war or not, but you can control the flux of money with pure strength. The FARC didn’t get into cocaine trafficking until a long time after it’s creation, and before the organization started to profit from cocaine they had already established a lucrative guerrilla empire. So, strength can drive money. Money finances strength. Immediately, on the short term, strength is more important than money. Only a bourgeois would think that he can buy a hired hitman that has a gun pointed to his forehead – he can’t. Only immediate strength can take out the hitman.

So now that I  determined that strength is immediately more important than money and that money cannot always buy you strength, I can say firmly that Trump’s plan is, for lack of a better expression, a piece of art. It’s a piece of art for two simple reasons:

1 – It finally comes up with solutions that are not naïve as the ones paleoconservatives and libertarians would present to America. You cannot fight against globalism and still think that the market will resolve all the issues by itself. The invisible hand can be controlled by the one who has more money, and it would not be a problem if the ones who had more money were still american patriots. So no, you cannot recreate a nation based purely on free trade. Internal strength has to be the basis of this american renaissance – whatever it may mean. At the same time, the plan doesn’t play well with hardcore neoconservatives that don’t want to get messy with China or anyone else. After all, they were the ones who designed this new world balance – and I’m not saying it didn’t work, but it doesn’t work anymore. Free market will sometimes help the Carlos Slims or the internationalists who are not even into the business game anymore, but into the power game. Those people are metacapitalists, as Brazilian philosopher Olavo de Carvalho has pointed out before. The simple logic of the market doesn’t apply to them anymore – they  can advocate free trade deals and praise capitalism while smoking a cohiba at Havana with the Castros. Many american conservatives don’t understand that. Maybe it’s their intellectual bases designed on a modern protestant conservative idea of defending the liberal democracy above everything. Other conservatives from all over the world tend to, sometimes, disagree with the modern conservative american protestant – neither market/profit nor the state/government can be the final goal, for you would be worshiping two different materialistic and revolutionary modern ideologies, if taken to their extremes.

2 – It’s more than an economic plan, it’s a statement. “Make America Great Again” has a lot to it: it’s an action of doers, to make. It has America as a central part of the sentence. It shows that America was once great and it can be that great again. It has everything. It fits the head of the millennial that is starting to ask if that was the life he or she would expect to be living: in debt, full of shame and with no big prospects (and worst than his parents). The plan is also fiscally conservative, which means a slap to the back of the head and the voice of your old dad saying: are you stupid? Get it right! I didn’t raise you to fuck things up and spend your money on hookers and cigars like there’s no tomorrow!

Technically, it also focus a lot on the fairness of international trade deals and foreign governments interfering with their currency by incentivizing devaluation and, well, making things difficult for America in many different ways. But this is something that even Obama has attacked when talking to Xi Jinping. This is the technical part of which everyone will say equal things. The most important is how Trump talks about it. He says he will label China a currency manipulator. It’s a whole different tone from what you can see today. He also raises the voice when it comes to companies leaving the US to manufacture on other places because of what he calls ‘horrible’ trade deals. As The Donald said before: “I pledge to never sign any trade agreement that hurts our workers, or that diminishes our freedom and independence…” – that is just more than a simple economic statement.

But where is the false song of globalism? It’s not very loud. It has dissonant notes that appear from time to time. At one moment, the dissonance comes as “free trade agreements” (but aren’t we all libertarians at heart?). At other moments, the dissonant notes resonate and sound like “free market is nice”. Well, free trade agreements, free market, egalitarianism, classical economic liberalism, it all sounds very good when the intentions are good. I am a Brazilian conservative. I’ve seen the appearance of a local right-wing ideology on the 90’s all over South America. Turns out 80% of them were actually so-called ex-socialists that now believed in “efficiency”, “markets” and “free trade agreements”. Well. I don’t even have to say that they created all the ways to a new coming of the left globalism. They paved the way for the creation of a continental parliament filled with politicians we don’t even get to choose. That is the left that fights the west on the basis of culture. And that left can say to you: oh, I believe in capitalism too! But once again: even the right tools on the hands of bad people turn into weapons of oppression.

Trump is on his way to balance the political arena. Strange interests inside american soil must be a thing of the past. Right now, it isn’t about the free markets and laissez-faire. It isn’t about defending what we all obviously believe in.

Right now, it’s about strength.

 

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